How the amount of work can compromise video course quality

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The instructional designer has an important role in eLearning. Their job is so important, in fact, that they often juggle a variety of responsibilities to get a new course or training off the ground.

With so many tasks on their plate, it’s bound to happen eventually: the instructional designer doesn’t meet their deadlines. This leaves you in the lurch, delaying projects and causing friction within your company, or compromise the video course quality.

The thing is, your instructional designer’s level of responsibility is directly tied to the quality of your entire training.

Let’s take a look at an instructional designer’s role in the eLearning process and how companies can better support them.

The instructional designer’s role

While their responsibilities vary by company, instructional designers fulfill three roles.

  1. Design and develop powerful eLearning courses
    One of the biggest challenges with eLearning is to develop an effective course. To make this a reality, you need to set clear eLearning objectives.

    Clear objectives help you stay on target with learner needs, align each module with course objectives, and give you an outline to work from. From this initial design, you can develop the content and appropriate graphics that make your eLearning course so effective.

    The instructional designer is also responsible for designing your course’s navigation, troubleshooting technology, and connecting with an LMS. And don’t forget that they’re also responsible for the course content!

    When it comes to developing the course itself, instructional designers have a lot on their plate. If you lengthen your eLearning course or video, that means there’s more for the instructional designer to do.

    If you want to keep that length, anticipate that the instructional designer will need some help.

    Support them with IT help when it comes to connecting to an LMS and other technology issues. An assist with client communication, storytelling, and course design will also free the instructional designer to focus on the video’s effectiveness.

  2. Simplifying and streamlining
    Instructional designers have to get the best results without sacrificing quality. It’s their job to simplify your video process. Instructional designers look for efficiencies in the process to create better videos for your learners.

    That’s why instructional designers try to limit the number or complexity of tasks required to get a video out.

    The problem? Instructional designers are busy working on the video itself. If you want high-quality training for your learners, your instructional designer actually needs to be doing less. With fewer tasks, they can focus more deeply on the things that matter to you.

    It’s okay to outsource for this expertise. A company like Ninja Tropic works with your training objectives to create videos without the hassle. You’re the boss: you approve every asset, sign off on storytelling, and green-light scripts before we use them on your video course.

  3. Multimedia collaboration
    Video is all about media. But instructional designers are experts in learning; they aren’t always experts in media. While some coding or design responsibilities may fall to the instructional designer, this is a recipe for overwhelm.

    Not only does the instructional designer create the learning framework for your course, but now they’re working on the video media. The instructional designer isn’t a graphic designer, though—asking them to work on media is a big task.

    Instead of focusing on multimedia production, the instructional designer should consult with a team of creatives. This should include someone who’s experienced in your LMS, a writer, a graphic designer, and video editor.

    If you don’t want to compromise the video course quality, the multimedia creative team will give you a more consistent tone and feel to the video course. Their expertise will not only give the instructional designer more of their time but improve the speed and quality of the product.

    Need help?

    Instructional designers need more support. But as their role evolves, the instructional designer is getting more and more tasks on their plate. Relieve them of some responsibility with outsourcing. Get the skills, time, and quality you need without the cost of hiring new employees.

    Ninja Tropic helps your team get the most out of your course. Want to bounce some ideas off of us? No problem. Just get in touch here for a free brainstorming session.

    Simplifying and streamlining multimedia collaboration

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